1969 Buick Electra in excellent condition has trouble starting for the first start of the day but after the first start... The rest of the day it starts normal. I had the carb rebuilt, new battery, and a new starter put in. I use a can of spray for cold start problems. Two sprays in the carb on the first start of the day and it starts right up. Engine runs smooth w 66 thousand miles. I am not sure what the source of my problem is. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

35

Asked by Feb 14, 2017 at 03:34 PM

Question type: Maintenance & Repair

10 Answers

73,035

When the engine is cold for the first start, check to see that the choke closes when you push on the gas pedal once at least 1/2 down. The choke may need to be set.

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25,755

Like Rowefast suggested, check choke, you mention carb was rebuilt but you can still have a weak accelerator pump or a gasket issue. Check if float bowls is bone dry after vehicle has been sitting for a while. Overnight they should not be going dry.

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
35

After having the problem with the first start of the day I had a new starter put in even though I was told the old one was fine... Just to make sure it wasn't the problem. When the mechanic installed the new starter he mentioned the carb being dry. He said the carb should be rebuilt even though I had it rebuilt 1 month prior. Thank you for the advice. I will research the topic of accelerator pump,gasket, and adjusting the choke.

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
90

also a good carb mechanic will epoxy [2] plugs on bottom side of float bowl if it is a quadrajet they start to leak over time. they will cause engine to run rich and drain bowl over night.

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
25,755

I went through all that with a 75 Elite this past summer, 2 rebuilds on a carb and float bowls still going dry, if car sat for more than a few hours. I found a tiny cap-full of gas (a water bottle cap to be precise) poured into carb to be better than all that starter fluid spray at starting engine (bit less of a fire hazard). If you have a bog or delay in acceleration I would think more accelerator pump, if it's just hard to start after sitting look into float bowls running dry.

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
90

starting fluid is nasty stuff watched a "mechanic" blow piston shrapnel thru the pan of a 65 Pontiac. he had sprayed the whole bloody can into 326 ci engine.

2 of 2 people found this helpful.
35

Thanks Ken, the carb spray is just a temporary fix as I figure out this riddle. It does seem to be dry after sitting for about 24 hours. But there isn't a bog or delay in acceleration. But I was wondering what would be the side effect of using two or three sprays per day...

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
69,305

Definitely sounds like either the float bowl is leaking down overnight and/or the automatic choke isn't closing. It could also be the choke pull off. The correct cold starting procedure for your Buick is turn on the ignition, press the accelerator pedal to the floor ONCE and release. Start the engine. When doing this one squirt of fuel should come out into the carburetor (you'll be able to see it) and the automatic choke should close. When the engine starts it should go to fast idle and the choke should be open slightly. Also, and here's an often overlooked item, the damper door inside of the air cleaner snorkel should raise (close) allowing only preheated air to the carburetor from the hose that goes from the snorkel to the exhaust manifold. HTH. -Jim

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35

Thanks for the help Jim, I appreciate it. -Mike

1 of 1 people found this helpful.
69,305

You're welcome Mike. Glad to help. Nice car BTW!! -Jim

1 of 1 people found this helpful.

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